Transforming #Food: All things considered – constraints, enablers, tensions and bold steps outlined in Food Ethics Council report

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New Food Ethics Council report published – it sets out the case for progressive action from the food and farming sectors. It also highlights how governments and food businesses should be held to account by citizens at the ballot box, in restaurants and in the supermarket aisles.

Geoff Tansey blog

Food-FEC-BF50

A new report by the Food Ethics Council – Food: All things considered – assesses the transformational changes needed to build fair and healthy food systems. It “provides a robust challenge to ‘business as usual’” said Justin King, former CEO of Sainsbury’s speaking about the changing face of food retail at the Council’s 50thBusiness Forum.

I’ve been a member of the Council since 2000 and we’ve been running these business forums since June 2007. I’ve chaired a few over the years, most recently the 49th on advertising.

The new report analyses the trends and tensions that have emerged over our 50 Business Forum meetings, and draws out the key levers that will drive transformational change. Liz Barling, our head of communications, summed up the three key changes as:

A radical shake up of how the market operates

Businesses in the UK and around the world…

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Poverty Alliance paper cautioning against the further entrenchment of foodbanks into Scotland’s welfare system

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Extract from Senscot’s weekly bulletin below:

“A recent parliamentary inquiry into hunger in the UK – called for an expansion of the food bank system – to be supplied by corporate food waste. A joint statement by Edinburgh and Glasgow city councils – boldly disagrees: “We believe that food waste is not an effective or socially just solution to food poverty.” A paper this week, from Scotland’s excellent Poverty Alliance, assembles research cautioning against the further entrenchment of foodbanks into Scotland’s welfare system.”

New report outlines the principles of healthy and sustainable diets

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03 June 2015 – published here.

Global Food Security, an alliance of the UK’s main public funders of food related research, has published a report highlighting 8 principles of healthy and sustainable eating patterns and concluded that pro-environmental diets were clearly compatible with healthy diets.

The eight principles are:

  • eat a varied balanced diet,
  • eat more plant based foods,
  • value your food and don’t waste it,
  • choose sustainable fish,
  • moderate your meat intake,
  • include milk and dairy products and where possible plant based alternatives,
  • drink tap water
  • eat fewer foods high in fat sugar and salt.

Supermarkets: end of an empire?

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“Listing all the potentially destructive or unethical features of this dominant food retail model would be a lengthy process. But in brief, supermarkets created a food monoculture in which most people buy and eat the same food across Britain. With their global, long-chain sourcing model, they undermined the age-old cycle of seasonal eating. They were the midwives of the ‘no-time-to-cook’ processed food revolution, which now looks to be a key driver of ill health and obesity. The supermarket business model works on a juggernaut of food miles, and has escalated food and packaging wastage to previously unthinkable levels. Supermarkets also denuded urban landscapes, blighted traditional high streets, put independents out of business all over the country, and bullied their way into communities while creating food deserts.”

Extract from Sustainable Food Trust article, found here.